Xcode beachballs when opening *any* existing project

  • It's finally happened to me.  This morning, while deleting text in a source code file, Xcode began beachballing.  After force-quitting, it now beachballs when I attempt to open *any* project I've previously created, including projects which I have not touched in weeks.  I am able to run Xcode on alternate launches by clicking "Don't Reopen" to the "last time you force quit" dialog.  But upon doing an "Open Recent" with any existing .xcodeproj, the ball starts rolling again.

    I've searched, and tried removing the following items…

    • ~/Library/Caches/com.apple.dt.Xcode
    • /Users/jk/Library/Application Support/Xcode/IntermediateBuildFiles
    • ~/Library/Preferences/com.apple.dt.Xcode.plist

    None of this helped.

    I'm still using Xcode 4.5 still (because I've read on this list that 4.6 builds apps which won't run on 10.6.)

    What's next?

    Thanks!

    Jerry Krinock
  • On Apr 16, 2013, at 09:37 , Jerry Krinock <jerry...> wrote:

    > because I've read on this list that 4.6 builds apps which won't run on 10.6

    4.6.1 fixed that.
  • On Apr 16, 2013, at 9:37 AM, Jerry Krinock <jerry...> wrote:

    > It's finally happened to me.  This morning, while deleting text in a source code file, Xcode began beachballing.  After force-quitting, it now beachballs when I attempt to open *any* project I've previously created, including projects which I have not touched in weeks

    I have this verbal tic where, whenever I hear the word “beachballs", I blurt out “sample it!”

    You’re lucky we’re not in the same office — if we were, I’d have hit you on the head with a stick like a cranky Zen master delivering a koan. ;-)

    Seriously, looking at what type of code the process is stuck in can very often identify the type of problem. And if not, it can be attached to a bug report to send to Apple.

    —Jens
  • Well, the solution was … Restart the Mac.

    On 2013 Apr 16, at 09:42, Quincey Morris <quinceymorris...> wrote:

    > 4.6.1 fixed [building for 10.6].

    Thanks, Quincey.  I'll update to to 4.6.2 now.
  • On Apr 16, 2013, at 10:25 , Jerry Krinock <jerry...> wrote:

    >> 4.6.1 fixed [building for 10.6].

    Perhaps it's worth adding that 4.6.1 *also* fixed -- for me at least -- the other problem where some apps built with Xcode 4.5/4.6 would crash on OS X10.6 when you (say) tried to choose something from the "File" menu. A few other people reported this behavior here or on cocoa-dev.

    AFAICT from the terse and cryptic response to my bug report on the matter, that other problem was a GC issue and it didn't sound like it was ever going to be fixed. ("GC is deprecated.")

    However, the app I was having trouble with now seems to run just fine on 10.6.8 when built with 4.6.1. At last I don't have to boot into 10.7 to use Xcode 4.3.3 to build for 10.6!
  • On Apr 16, 2013, at 09:43, Jens Alfke <jens...> wrote:

    >
    > On Apr 16, 2013, at 9:37 AM, Jerry Krinock <jerry...> wrote:
    >
    >> It's finally happened to me.  This morning, while deleting text in a source code file, Xcode began beachballing.  After force-quitting, it now beachballs when I attempt to open *any* project I've previously created, including projects which I have not touched in weeks
    >
    > I have this verbal tic where, whenever I hear the word “beachballs", I blurt out “sample it!”

    "sample" is so last decade :)

    The new hotness is spindump. Spindump has the advantage that it samples all of the processes running on the system. This is becoming more and more valuable, as many modern Mac applications (including Xcode) rely on other processes to do a lot of the heavy lifting (whether they be command-line tools such as the compiler, launchd launch agents, xpc services or whatever else). For apps like these sample may only be providing half of the picture. (i.e. it may be clear that Xcode is waiting on some other process, but you get no insight into what that other process is busy doing)

    > You’re lucky we’re not in the same office — if we were, I’d have hit you on the head with a stick like a cranky Zen master delivering a koan. ;-)
    >
    > Seriously, looking at what type of code the process is stuck in can very often identify the type of problem. And if not, it can be attached to a bug report to send to Apple.

    Even more in-depth is sysdiagnose. While it can be overkill in many situations, I find myself often asking for its output as it includes a vast amount of data useful for diagnosing all sorts of issues (you can run it yourself and peek at the data it generates to get an idea of just how in depth it goes). It is one of the first tools I run in the event of a spin or hang or if I see strange memory use in an app.

    --
    Clark Smith Cox III
    <clark.cox...>
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