Obj-C and Mac OS BSIT Degree

  • Hello,

    I am interested in furthering my education in programming by studying
    for a BA in IT. I was looking a schools and nobody seems to focus on
    Obj-C or Apple Developer related courses. I was looking for
    suggestions of schools to attend to better fit my degree towards Apple
    Development.

    Thanks,

    Justin
    <jschneck...>
  • I found the same thing at the nearby universities and colleges. I did find
    out that our Computer Science department offers an independent projects
    course. I bought a copy of "Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X" and "Programming
    in Objective-C", created my own schedule of the curriculum for a semester,
    and had it approved by the head of the department. Maybe you could do
    something similar.
    This email list has been a great resource for asking clarifying questions on
    concepts or getting help with code. There are other sites too, that provide
    valuable resources when you don't have an instructor to go to for questions.

    Good luck!
    Jason

    On Jan 2, 2008 2:15 PM, Justin Schneck <jschneck...> wrote:

    > Hello,
    >
    > I am interested in furthering my education in programming by studying
    > for a BA in IT. I was looking a schools and nobody seems to focus on
    > Obj-C or Apple Developer related courses. I was looking for
    > suggestions of schools to attend to better fit my degree towards Apple
    > Development.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Justin
    > <jschneck...>
    >
  • On Jan 3, 2008 12:28 PM, Jason Barker <misterbarker...> wrote:

    I found the same thing at the nearby universities and colleges. I did find
    > out that our Computer Science department offers an independent projects
    > course.

    A good computer science degree will offer you a foundation in things like
    data structures and algorithms, and expose you to a variety of different
    programming approaches and languages.  And this is a good thing:  once you
    understand object orientation and MVC, Cocoa is very straightforward to pick
    up, as is Java, and object-oriented Perl, and C#.NET, and any of a dozen
    other languages and environments.  But if you've had four years of what
    amounts to vocational training in coding Java, for instance, you don't have
    the foundation to easily pick up other technologies.

    That said, I think Jason's approach is exactly the right one:  get the
    computer science degree for the foundation, and work on an independent
    project to learn Cocoa.

    (Someone, I think on this list, commented that one of the things that makes
    the average Cocoa programmer much better than the average Java programmer is
    that Cocoa *isn't* taught in schools, so the Cocoa programmer is motivated
    enough to be self-taught, or at least to further his education outside the
    university.  The *best* Java programmers and the *best* Cocoa programmers
    are at the same level of wizardry, but there are a lot more mediocre Java
    programmers.)

    Charlton

    > I bought a copy of "Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X" and "Programming
    > in Objective-C", created my own schedule of the curriculum for a semester,
    > and had it approved by the head of the department. Maybe you could do
    > something similar.
    > This email list has been a great resource for asking clarifying questions
    > on
    > concepts or getting help with code. There are other sites too, that
    > provide
    > valuable resources when you don't have an instructor to go to for
    > questions.
    >
    >
    > Good luck!
    > Jason
    >
    >
    > On Jan 2, 2008 2:15 PM, Justin Schneck <jschneck...> wrote:
    >
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> I am interested in furthering my education in programming by studying
    >> for a BA in IT. I was looking a schools and nobody seems to focus on
    >> Obj-C or Apple Developer related courses. I was looking for
    >> suggestions of schools to attend to better fit my degree towards Apple
    >> Development.
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >>
    >> Justin
    >> <jschneck...>
    >>

    >

    --
    Charlton Wilbur
    <cwilbur...>
    <cwilbur...>
  • > (Someone, I think on this list, commented that one of the things
    > that makes
    > the average Cocoa programmer much better than the average Java
    > programmer is
    > that Cocoa *isn't* taught in schools, so the Cocoa programmer is
    > motivated

    That's a great comment, and it is true for most people, but Cocoa is
    taught in at least one school. Stanford offers CS193E Cocoa
    Programming. If you are looking for a school that leads you towards
    Apple development, Stanford might be a good pick. However, as others
    have mentioned, the best programmers have as solid base in data
    structures and algorithms, and the language or platform really doesn't
    matter so much (at first).

    --corbin
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