how to build finalcut-pro style gui apps?

  • hi all,

    i'm trying to build an application and it would be nice to use the same
    interface as finalcut pro server. is there anyway to do this ??

    many thanks!!

    guillem
  • --- Guillem Palou <guillem.palou...> wrote:

    > i'm trying to build an application and it would be
    > nice to use the same
    > interface as finalcut pro server. is there anyway to
    > do this ??

    As in, without having to design it yourself? No.

    Cheers,
    Chuck


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  • On Sep 25, 2007, at 12:08 PM, Guillem Palou wrote:

    > i'm trying to build an application and it would be nice to use the
    > same
    > interface as finalcut pro server. is there anyway to do this ??

    http://developer.apple.com/documentation/DeveloperTools/Conceptual/
    IBTips/index.html

    Play around with IB and see if that helps.  If that's too thick try
    this:

    http://developer.apple.com/documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/
    ObjCTutorial/index.html?http://developer.apple.com/documentation/
    Cocoa/Conceptual/ObjCTutorial/chapter01/chapter_1_section_1.html#//
    apple_ref/doc/uid/20001101

    It's the steps from the Currency Converter tutorial that show how to
    build an interface.

    Steve Kirks
    http://houseofwarwick.com/
    <warwick...>
    AIM/iChat: <srk...>
  • >> i'm trying to build an application and it would be nice to use the
    >> same
    >> interface as finalcut pro server. is there anyway to do this ??
    >
    > It's the steps from the Currency Converter tutorial that show how to
    > build an interface.

      I can't tell if this is meant to be funny/harsh or it's just missing
    the mark by a wide margin. :-)

      Essentially, there are no standard controls in Interface Builder
    that emulate the look and feel of Apple's pro apps. If you want
    non-standard Cocoa controls you have to build them yourself. Assuming
    you're beyond the introductory material Steve just pointed you to,
    you'll want to check out the following:

    Control and Cell Programming Topics for Cocoa
    http://developer.apple.com/documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/ControlCell/index
    .html


    NSControl Class Reference
    http://developer.apple.com/documentation/Cocoa/Reference/ApplicationKit/Cla
    sses/NSControl_Class/Reference/Reference.html


    Clock Control Sample Code
    http://developer.apple.com/samplecode/Clock_Control/index.html

    --
    I.S.
  • On Sep 25, 2007, at 1:16 PM, I. Savant wrote:

    >>> i'm trying to build an application and it would be nice to use the
    >>> same
    >>> interface as finalcut pro server. is there anyway to do this ??

    I believe Final Cut, et. al use something called ProKit.  But, that's
    currently a private Apple framework.  I would imagine that it will
    remain private as well.

    >>
    >> It's the steps from the Currency Converter tutorial that show how to
    >> build an interface.
    >
    > I can't tell if this is meant to be funny/harsh or it's just missing
    > the mark by a wide margin. :-)
    >
    > Essentially, there are no standard controls in Interface Builder
    > that emulate the look and feel of Apple's pro apps. If you want
    > non-standard Cocoa controls you have to build them yourself. Assuming
    > you're beyond the introductory material Steve just pointed you to,
    > you'll want to check out the following:
    >
    > Control and Cell Programming Topics for Cocoa
    > http://developer.apple.com/documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/
    > ControlCell/index.html
    >
    > NSControl Class Reference
    > http://developer.apple.com/documentation/Cocoa/Reference/
    > ApplicationKit/Classes/NSControl_Class/Reference/Reference.html
    >
    > Clock Control Sample Code
    > http://developer.apple.com/samplecode/Clock_Control/index.html

    And, before diving in on such an adventure, here are some things to
    ponder that may increase your development time:

    - Making IB palettes for your custom UI will save you tons of time in
    the long run.  But, development of the palettes can be quite tricky.

    - Remember to make your custom UI resolution-independent savvy.

    - If accessibility is important to you, you often need to write a
    decent amount of code so that your UI elements do the right thing
    (e.g. integrates well with VoiceOver)

    I've done all these myself for my kiosk-style apps.  I only do Cocoa
    coding part-time, but it took over a year to get everything rock solid.

    I don't want to scare anyone from doing this, but just wanted to
    point out those things you may take for granted when using standard
    Aqua UI.

    ___________________________________________________________
    Ricky A. Sharp        mailto:<rsharp...>
    Instant Interactive(tm)  http://www.instantinteractive.com
  • On Sep 25, 2007, at 3:23 PM, Ricky Sharp wrote:

    > ...Final Cut, et. al use something called ProKit...

    Reading to fast at the end of a day, my eyes saw that as "Pork Kit"
    and wondered if there was an inside joke I'd missed.

    >> I can't tell if this is meant to be funny/harsh or it's just
    >> missing
    >> the mark by a wide margin. :-)

    Missing the mark.  Let the rotten tomatoes fly!  :)

    > And, before diving in on such an adventure, here are some things to
    > ponder that may increase your development time:
    >
    > - Making IB palettes for your custom UI will save you tons of time
    > in the long run.  But, development of the palettes can be quite
    > tricky.
    >
    > - Remember to make your custom UI resolution-independent savvy.
    >
    > - If accessibility is important to you, you often need to write a
    > decent amount of code so that your UI elements do the right thing
    > (e.g. integrates well with VoiceOver)

    What's interesting in the previous commented text is, to a "newbie",
    it would seem like the UI is something they would never spend that
    much time writing and designing.  It amazes me that I can see myself
    writing a year's worth of code to drive an interface for a back-end
    that hadn't been built--and enjoying it.ß

    Steve Kirks
    http://houseofwarwick.com/
    <warwick...>
    AIM/iChat: <srk...>
  • So at this point, has anyone developed a public framework project to
    try and solve this constant need for this copy cat ui?

    It sure is neat and would be nice to have.

    On 9/25/07, Steve Kirks <warwick...> wrote:
    > On Sep 25, 2007, at 3:23 PM, Ricky Sharp wrote:
    >
    >> ...Final Cut, et. al use something called ProKit...
    >
    > Reading to fast at the end of a day, my eyes saw that as "Pork Kit"
    > and wondered if there was an inside joke I'd missed.
    >
    >
    >>> I can't tell if this is meant to be funny/harsh or it's just
    >>> missing
    >>> the mark by a wide margin. :-)
    >
    > Missing the mark.  Let the rotten tomatoes fly!  :)
    >
    >> And, before diving in on such an adventure, here are some things to
    >> ponder that may increase your development time:
    >>
    >> - Making IB palettes for your custom UI will save you tons of time
    >> in the long run.  But, development of the palettes can be quite
    >> tricky.
    >>
    >> - Remember to make your custom UI resolution-independent savvy.
    >>
    >> - If accessibility is important to you, you often need to write a
    >> decent amount of code so that your UI elements do the right thing
    >> (e.g. integrates well with VoiceOver)
    >
    > What's interesting in the previous commented text is, to a "newbie",
    > it would seem like the UI is something they would never spend that
    > much time writing and designing.  It amazes me that I can see myself
    > writing a year's worth of code to drive an interface for a back-end
    > that hadn't been built--and enjoying it.ß
    >
    > Steve Kirks
    > http://houseofwarwick.com/
    > <warwick...>
    > AIM/iChat: <srk...>
    >
  • > So at this point, has anyone developed a public framework project to
    > try and solve this constant need for this copy cat ui?
    >
      Not to my knowledge.

    > It sure is neat and would be nice to have.
    >
      Sure would - perhaps starting an open source endeavor on
    sourceforge would help get things going? You will probably need to
    drum up participation by advertising the effort on the usual channels,
    but you might get something started.

    --
    I.S.
  • On Sep 25, 2007, at 7:38 PM, colo wrote:

    > constant need for this copy cat ui?

    Hi,

    I'm not much for flame wars or anything, and I'm only a newbie
    developer, but it seems to me that designing something new would be
    more useful. The very creative folks at Apple design and test the
    stuff they put into their pro frameworks. For them, its a creative
    flourish. That's probably why Apple keeps it a private framework.

    Instead, it might be useful to design new and better interfaces.
    Maybe you can take us further than what Apple has done, something
    cooler. Something that provides better interaction.

    my humble 0.218470 MXN,

    Jaime Magiera
    Sensory Research Network
    http://www.sensoryresearch.net
  • If anyone does want to imitate it, they can always link to the images
    contained in the ProKit framework at runtime. No, I don't me copy them
    into your app, but just read them when needed. However, this approach
    would break if Apple renamed any of the images or deleted them
    entirely. So, you definitely would want some backup images.

    Regards,
    David Alger

    On Sep 25, 2007, at 6:38 PM, colo wrote:

    > So at this point, has anyone developed a public framework project to
    > try and solve this constant need for this copy cat ui?
    >
    > It sure is neat and would be nice to have.
    >
    > On 9/25/07, Steve Kirks <warwick...> wrote:
    >> On Sep 25, 2007, at 3:23 PM, Ricky Sharp wrote:
    >>
    >>> ...Final Cut, et. al use something called ProKit...
    >>
    >> Reading to fast at the end of a day, my eyes saw that as "Pork Kit"
    >> and wondered if there was an inside joke I'd missed.
    >>
    >>
    >>>> I can't tell if this is meant to be funny/harsh or it's just
    >>>> missing
    >>>> the mark by a wide margin. :-)
    >>
    >> Missing the mark.  Let the rotten tomatoes fly!  :)
    >>
    >>> And, before diving in on such an adventure, here are some things to
    >>> ponder that may increase your development time:
    >>>
    >>> - Making IB palettes for your custom UI will save you tons of time
    >>> in the long run.  But, development of the palettes can be quite
    >>> tricky.
    >>>
    >>> - Remember to make your custom UI resolution-independent savvy.
    >>>
    >>> - If accessibility is important to you, you often need to write a
    >>> decent amount of code so that your UI elements do the right thing
    >>> (e.g. integrates well with VoiceOver)
    >>
    >> What's interesting in the previous commented text is, to a "newbie",
    >> it would seem like the UI is something they would never spend that
    >> much time writing and designing.  It amazes me that I can see myself
    >> writing a year's worth of code to drive an interface for a back-end
    >> that hadn't been built--and enjoying it.ß
    >>
    >> Steve Kirks
    >> http://houseofwarwick.com/
    >> <warwick...>
    >> AIM/iChat: <srk...>
    >>


    ********************
    Ron Paul for President 2008
    http://ronpaul2008.com/

    RESTORE THE REPUBLIC
  • On Sep 25, 2007, at 8:56 PM, David Alger wrote:

    > If anyone does want to imitate it, they can always link to the
    > images contained in the ProKit framework at runtime. No, I don't me
    > copy them into your app, but just read them when needed. However,
    > this approach would break if Apple renamed any of the images or
    > deleted them entirely. So, you definitely would want some backup
    > images.

    This assumes/requires that your all of your end users will have
    ProKit framework installed (which is not installed as part of the OS).

    Glenn Andreas                      <gandreas...>
      <http://www.gandreas.com/> wicked fun!
    quadrium2 | build, mutate, evolve, animate  | images, textures,
    fractals, art
  • On Sep 25, 2007, at 9:29 PM, glenn andreas wrote:

    >
    > On Sep 25, 2007, at 8:56 PM, David Alger wrote:
    >
    >> If anyone does want to imitate it, they can always link to the
    >> images contained in the ProKit framework at runtime. No, I don't me
    >> copy them into your app, but just read them when needed. However,
    >> this approach would break if Apple renamed any of the images or
    >> deleted them entirely. So, you definitely would want some backup
    >> images.
    >
    > This assumes/requires that your all of your end users will have
    > ProKit framework installed (which is not installed as part of the OS).

    It's on mine, and I don't have any of Apple's "Pro-Apps" that would
    have installed it. So, if it isn't installed with OS X, I definitely
    wouldn't know what did install it!

    Regards,
    David Alger

    >
    >
    >
    > Glenn Andreas                      <gandreas...>
    > <http://www.gandreas.com/> wicked fun!
    > quadrium2 | build, mutate, evolve, animate  | images, textures,
    > fractals, art

    --
    David Alger,
    Software Engineer
    Family Friendly Software, LLC
    http://www.familyfriendlysoftware.com

    Looking for a reliable, affordable, and customer oriented web host?
    With BlueHost you get a FREE domain name and FREE setup plus a
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  • Well despite everything, this talk about making your own ui so so
    different than it was in January. Back then every developer would
    scream at you if you wanted to make anything but using the prefab IB
    widgets

    What about a new sudo IB that works like Flash or CSS for artists but
    still use layout logic for the ui buildng scaling and moding.

    On 9/26/07, David Alger <dev-lists...> wrote:
    >
    > On Sep 25, 2007, at 9:29 PM, glenn andreas wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> On Sep 25, 2007, at 8:56 PM, David Alger wrote:
    >>
    >>> If anyone does want to imitate it, they can always link to the
    >>> images contained in the ProKit framework at runtime. No, I don't me
    >>> copy them into your app, but just read them when needed. However,
    >>> this approach would break if Apple renamed any of the images or
    >>> deleted them entirely. So, you definitely would want some backup
    >>> images.
    >>
    >> This assumes/requires that your all of your end users will have
    >> ProKit framework installed (which is not installed as part of the OS).
    >
    > It's on mine, and I don't have any of Apple's "Pro-Apps" that would
    > have installed it. So, if it isn't installed with OS X, I definitely
    > wouldn't know what did install it!
    >
    > Regards,
    > David Alger
    >
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Glenn Andreas                      <gandreas...>
    >> <http://www.gandreas.com/> wicked fun!
    >> quadrium2 | build, mutate, evolve, animate  | images, textures,
    >> fractals, art
    >
    > --
    > David Alger,
    > Software Engineer
    > Family Friendly Software, LLC
    > http://www.familyfriendlysoftware.com
    >
    > Looking for a reliable, affordable, and customer oriented web host?
    > With BlueHost you get a FREE domain name and FREE setup plus a
    > first-class hosting package for ONLY $6.95 a month!
    > Signup here <http://www.bluehost.com/track/familyfr/>, and look no
    > further!
    >
  • On Sep 26, 2007, at 7:19 AM, colo wrote:

    > Well despite everything, this talk about making your own ui so so
    > different than it was in January. Back then every developer would
    > scream at you if you wanted to make anything but using the prefab IB
    > widgets

    You should strive to always use the standard Cocoa widgets whenever
    possible.  For my needs, I really needed a different UI (kids
    software running in a kiosk mode; i.e. large colorful buttons, no
    menus, etc.)

    Having said that, I believe there are really two issues here when
    wanting your own UI.

    First, there's the appearance of the widgets.  Some folks simply want
    to skin things.  For that, you again should just use the standard
    look-and-feel.

    The second one is how the widgets actually work.  It's often the case
    where the standard collection doesn't quite fit the bill.  But,
    definitely file bug reports on what controls you need.  Apple has,
    over time, added a decent amount of new widgets to Cocoa's palette.

    ___________________________________________________________
    Ricky A. Sharp        mailto:<rsharp...>
    Instant Interactive(tm)  http://www.instantinteractive.com
  • Am 26.09.2007 um 01:53 schrieb I. Savant:
    > Sure would - perhaps starting an open source endeavor on
    > sourceforge would help get things going? You will probably need to
    > drum up participation by advertising the effort on the usual
    > channels, but you might get something started.

      Well, I'd suggest if he's serious, he start implementing it and put
    something that actually does something up on SourceForge. There's
    millions of projects that have an idea and starve waiting for
    developers to flock to them simply because everyone who sees the
    project doesn't want to invest any effort in a project of which they
    don't know if anyone else will help them.

      Someone has to make that leap of faith and post code.

      FWIW, I think there's already a custom UI kit out there for HUD
    windows and controls in them. May be possible to just create a
    "theme" of that that matches ProKit.

    Cheers,
    -- M. Uli Kusterer
    http://www.zathras.de
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