Incremental Development?

  • I would like to develop in small steps, making new version each time and
    keeping the old versions intact. So I might begin with MyProject1, then make
    a new version MyProject2 (without destroying MyProject1) and so on.

    But how do you actually accomplish this in Cocoa. Is there any simple way to
    accomplish this kind of incremental development?

    Thanks Frank
  • On Sep 13, 2007, at 12:12 PM, Frank Bettger wrote:

    > I would like to develop in small steps, making new version each
    > time and
    > keeping the old versions intact. So I might begin with MyProject1,
    > then make
    > a new version MyProject2 (without destroying MyProject1) and so on.
    >
    > But how do you actually accomplish this in Cocoa. Is there any
    > simple way to
    > accomplish this kind of incremental development?

    Isn't this what Source Control is for? (CVS, SVN, etc.)
  • That would have been my first suggestion. If you need a small, free one look
    at www.cvsdude.com they provide a free svn repo for you

    On 13/09/2007, Stéphane Sudre <ssudre...> wrote:
    >
    >
    > On Sep 13, 2007, at 12:12 PM, Frank Bettger wrote:
    >
    >> I would like to develop in small steps, making new version each
    >> time and
    >> keeping the old versions intact. So I might begin with MyProject1,
    >> then make
    >> a new version MyProject2 (without destroying MyProject1) and so on.
    >>
    >> But how do you actually accomplish this in Cocoa. Is there any
    >> simple way to
    >> accomplish this kind of incremental development?
    >
    > Isn't this what Source Control is for? (CVS, SVN, etc.)
    >

    --

    ./Sven
  • On Sep 13, 2007, at 5:23 AM, Sven wrote:

    > That would have been my first suggestion. If you need a small, free
    > one look
    > at www.cvsdude.com they provide a free svn repo for you

    You can also download Perforce (www.perforce.com) and use it.  Without
    any license you can have two users, I believe.
  • forgot to mention git, which doesn't need an online repository

    http://git.or.cz/

    keeps the entire dev history in the local folder. Comes with some nice tools
    too

    On 13/09/2007, Scott Thompson <easco...> wrote:
    >
    >
    > On Sep 13, 2007, at 5:23 AM, Sven wrote:
    >
    >> That would have been my first suggestion. If you need a small, free
    >> one look
    >> at www.cvsdude.com they provide a free svn repo for you
    >
    > You can also download Perforce (www.perforce.com) and use it.  Without
    > any license you can have two users, I believe.
    >

    --

    ./Sven
  • Sven wrote:
    > forgot to mention git, which doesn't need an online repository
    >
    > http://git.or.cz/
    >
    > keeps the entire dev history in the local folder. Comes with some nice tools
    > too
    >
    > On 13/09/2007, Scott Thompson <easco...> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> On Sep 13, 2007, at 5:23 AM, Sven wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> That would have been my first suggestion. If you need a small, free
    >>> one look
    >>> at www.cvsdude.com they provide a free svn repo for you
    >>
    >> You can also download Perforce (www.perforce.com) and use it.  Without
    >> any license you can have two users, I believe.
    >>

    Not to be pedantic, but SVN doesn't need an online repository. It's very
    easy to setup a local repository. Just access it with
    file:///path/to/repository or
    svn+ssh://machinename.local/path/to/repository.

    - Rush
  • On Sep 13, 2007, at 5:56 AM, Sven wrote:

    > forgot to mention git, which doesn't need an online repository
    >
    > http://git.or.cz/
    >
    > keeps the entire dev history in the local folder. Comes with some
    > nice tools
    > too

    While we're mentioning distributed version control systems, two other
    leading contenders (both a bit easier to approach than git, in my
    opinion):

    Mercurial (aka hg)
    http://www.selenic.com/mercurial/wiki/

    Bazaar (aka bzr, aka bazaar-ng)
    http://bazaar-vcs.org/

    The main issue with all of these systems is that they don't integrate
    with Xcode.  If you don't mind playing at the command-line, they're
    pretty easy to use separately anyway.  If you really want everything
    to happen in Xcode, you're pretty much stuck with CVS, Perforce, or
    Subversion.  If you have to choose, I'd choose the latter.

    --John
  • Correct yes. Sorry, I didn't mean to imply that the others need an online
    repo. Git however resides in the project directory and comes with some nice
    tools to keep track of branching etc.

    I just offered it up as an alternative suggestion really.

    On 13/09/2007, Rush Manbert <rush...> wrote:
    >
    > Sven wrote:
    >> forgot to mention git, which doesn't need an online repository
    >>
    >> http://git.or.cz/
    >>
    >> keeps the entire dev history in the local folder. Comes with some nice
    > tools
    >> too
    >>
    >> On 13/09/2007, Scott Thompson <easco...> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> On Sep 13, 2007, at 5:23 AM, Sven wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> That would have been my first suggestion. If you need a small, free
    >>>> one look
    >>>> at www.cvsdude.com they provide a free svn repo for you
    >>>
    >>> You can also download Perforce (www.perforce.com) and use it.  Without
    >>> any license you can have two users, I believe.
    >>>
    >
    > Not to be pedantic, but SVN doesn't need an online repository. It's very
    > easy to setup a local repository. Just access it with
    > file:///path/to/repository or
    > svn+ssh://machinename.local/path/to/repository.
    >
    > - Rush
    >

    --

    ./Sven
  • On 13/09/2007, Frank Bettger <frankbettger...> wrote:
    > I would like to develop in small steps, making new version each time and
    > keeping the old versions intact. So I might begin with MyProject1, then make
    > a new version MyProject2 (without destroying MyProject1) and so on.
    >
    > But how do you actually accomplish this in Cocoa. Is there any simple way to
    > accomplish this kind of incremental development?

    http://developer.apple.com/internet/opensource/cvsoverview.html

    --
    Igor M.
    Napoleon: "Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained
    by incompetence"
  • Yes, that's what I'm doing right now. I'm making a duplicate of the whole
    folder. The folder name I can change but the name of the project, etc stays
    the same since there are too many places to change. The version control
    system suggested by others is powerful but for my  purpose right now feels
    like using a gun to kill a fly. When I create more complex projects I will
    use a version control system but right now I'm learning Cocoa by making
    simple toy projects. And the duplication of the whole project folder seems
    to be the simplest thing.

    On 9/16/07, Scott Ribe <scott_ribe...> wrote:
    >
    >
    > cmd-D in the Finder?
    >
    >
  • On Sep 16, 2007, at 2:54 PM, Frank Bettger wrote:
    > The version control system suggested by others is powerful but for
    > my  purpose right now feels
    > like using a gun to kill a fly.

    Using version control is a good habit to get into.  My general rule of
    thumb is that any code that I work on for more than one day gets
    versioned.  Once you've learned to use the tools (I favor svn) there
    is practically zero overhead involved with them, and they'll save you
    a lot of trouble in the long run.

    -T
  • El 17/9/2007, a las 4:55, Tim Kolar escribió:

    >
    > On Sep 16, 2007, at 2:54 PM, Frank Bettger wrote:
    >> The version control system suggested by others is powerful but
    >> for my  purpose right now feels
    >> like using a gun to kill a fly.
    >
    > Using version control is a good habit to get into.  My general rule
    > of thumb is that any code that I work on for more than one day gets
    > versioned.  Once you've learned to use the tools (I favor svn)
    > there is practically zero overhead involved with them, and they'll
    > save you a lot of trouble in the long run.

    I also feel that version control is worth the (minor) overhead
    involved, but for those who aren't (yet?) interested in using it
    Leopard will soon be bringing cheap project snapshots without any
    additional tools:

    <http://developer.apple.com/leopard/overview/tools.html>

    Cheers,
    Wincent
  • Am 16.09.2007 um 23:54 schrieb Frank Bettger:
    >
    > the same since there are too many places to change. The version
    > control
    > system suggested by others is powerful but for my  purpose right now
    > feels
    > like using a gun to kill a fly. When I create more complex projects
    > I will
    > use a version control system but right now I'm learning Cocoa by
    > making
    > simple toy projects.

    The impression version control only pays off for large projects is
    wrong. Especially as subversion is rather easy to set up local.

    Regards,
    Tom_E
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