Core Data Applications

  • Hi All,

      I wanted to know that can I use NSManagedObjects without core data application.
      Because my Mac machine version is 10.3.9 and it doesnt support core data application.
      If you suggest me some way to implement core data application in this version of Mac.

      Thanks & Regards,
      Friendy


    ---------------------------------
    Stay in the know. Pulse on the new Yahoo.com.  Check it out.
  • On Oct 11, 2006, at 5:23 AM, manoj agrawal wrote:

    > I wanted to know that can I use NSManagedObjects without core
    > data application.
    > Because my Mac machine version is 10.3.9 and it doesnt support
    > core data application.

    You have to upgrade to Tiger (10.4) or later. Core Data was never
    back-ported from Tiger.

    Nick Zitzmann
    <http://www.chronosnet.com/>
  • On Oct 11, 2006, at 4:23 AM, manoj agrawal wrote:

    > I wanted to know that can I use NSManagedObjects without core data
    > application.
    > Because my Mac machine version is 10.3.9 and it doesnt support
    > core data application.
    > If you suggest me some way to implement core data application in
    > this version of Mac.

    There is more to developing an application that uses Core Data than
    just using an Xcode project template with Core Data in the name.  (In
    fact, it isn't necessary to use such a project template to create an
    application that uses Core Data.)

    Core Data is a technology that was introduced with Tiger, so you will
    need to use Mac OS X 10.4 or later to develop and test applications
    that use Core Data, and these applications will only run on Mac OS X
    10.4 or later.

      -- Chris
  • Am 11.10.2006 um 13:23 schrieb manoj agrawal:
    > I wanted to know that can I use NSManagedObjects without core
    > data application.
    > Because my Mac machine version is 10.3.9 and it doesnt support
    > core data application.
    > If you suggest me some way to implement core data application in
    > this version of Mac.

    You would have to implement your own CoreData. And that would be a
    lot to do. If you really need 10.3, your alternative would be to do
    all of this yourself, e.g. by adding SQLite to your application and
    writing all the database lookup and storing code yourself, with your
    own custom type of object.

    Your last straw may be checking out GNUstep.org whether they have
    cloned CoreData yet, and evaluating whether that works sufficiently
    to package it with your application. But I wouldn't get my hopes up.
    Considering how new and complex CoreData is and how much of it is
    done through special UI, it's unlikely there's a production-quality
    clone of it out there yet.

    Cheers,
    -- M. Uli Kusterer
    http://www.zathras.de
  • On 15/10/2006, at 12.05, Uli Kusterer wrote:

    > Considering how new and complex CoreData is and how much of it is
    > done through special UI

    What do you mean, special UI? The data modeler?

    I would love to see a textual file format for data models. I think
    the current situation is untenable: Graphical editor saves to
    undocumented binary .xcdatamodel format, momc compiler translates to
    undocumented binary .mom format.

    The data model is one of the most important things to keep under
    strict version control. What happened to diff? svn blame?
  • On Oct 15, 2006, at 3:38 AM, Jakob Olesen wrote:
    > On 15/10/2006, at 12.05, Uli Kusterer wrote:
    >> Considering how new and complex CoreData is and how much of it is
    >> done through special UI
    >
    > What do you mean, special UI? The data modeler?
    >
    > I would love to see a textual file format for data models. I think
    > the current situation is untenable: Graphical editor saves to
    > undocumented binary .xcdatamodel format, momc compiler translates
    > to undocumented binary .mom format.
    >
    > The data model is one of the most important things to keep under
    > strict version control. What happened to diff? svn blame?

    There is a huge difference between a textual file format and a
    textual file format that is diffable, blameable and ponderable.

    (Though I fully agree that a diff/blame/ponder compatible textual
    file format would be really *really* valuable).

    There is nothing particular proprietary about the contents of a
    model.  The momc basically takes the inbound .xcdatamodel and strips
    out down to a minimal binary representation of exactly what is needed
    at runtime (layout of the entity diagram is not needed, for example).

    The Core Data API includes everything you need to fully read/write
    models.  As such, it wouldn't be hard to read a model -- maybe even
    passing the model through momc first -- and generate a text file
    describing the model from there.  You could even do it so that
    diffing two version of a model from svn was trivial -- automatic even.

    b.bum
previous month october 2006 next month
MTWTFSS
            1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31          
Go to today