[NSViewAnimation BUG] NSAnimationEaseOut

  • According to the documentation:

    NSAnimationEaseOut
    Describes an animation that slowly speeds up from the start.

    Available in Mac OS X v10.4 and later.

    ---------

    This does not explain why when you use NSAnimationEaseOut, the
    animation is displayed in the reversed order (i.e. End -> Start).

    Mac OS X 10.4.8.
  • I've used both NSAnimation and NSViewAnimation classes quite a bit
    and haven't encountered the bug you mentioned.

    Perhaps you are confusing NSAnimationEaseOut (relevant to
    NSAnimation) with NSViewAnimationFadeOutEffect (relevant to
    NSViewAnimation)?

    NSAnimationEaseOut is a constant that affects NSAnimation (the base
    class for NSViewAnimation).  NSAnimation always progresses from 0.0
    to 1.0, and the constants such as NSAnimationEaseOut affect how this
    progress occurs over time.  If you subclass NSAnimation and override
    currentProgress you can observe the animation progress from 0.0 to 1.0.

    --
    ivan

    On Oct 6, 2006, at 9:15 AM, Stephane wrote:

    > According to the documentation:
    >
    > NSAnimationEaseOut
    > Describes an animation that slowly speeds up from the start.
    >
    > Available in Mac OS X v10.4 and later.
    >
    > ---------
    >
    > This does not explain why when you use NSAnimationEaseOut, the
    > animation is displayed in the reversed order (i.e. End -> Start).
    >
    > Mac OS X 10.4.8.
  • nope, ive also noticed this bug with NSViewAnimation.

    you have to swap over the start and end keys, else it goes in reverse.
    there also another bug that causes the animation to never fully finish,
    so you have to record where the final frame would be and give it a tiny
    nudge at the end of the animation to get it to its final resting place.

    Ivan Kourtev wrote:
    > I've used both NSAnimation and NSViewAnimation classes quite a bit and
    > haven't encountered the bug you mentioned.
    >
    > Perhaps you are confusing NSAnimationEaseOut (relevant to NSAnimation)
    > with NSViewAnimationFadeOutEffect (relevant to NSViewAnimation)?
    >
    > NSAnimationEaseOut is a constant that affects NSAnimation (the base
    > class for NSViewAnimation).  NSAnimation always progresses from 0.0 to
    > 1.0, and the constants such as NSAnimationEaseOut affect how this
    > progress occurs over time.  If you subclass NSAnimation and override
    > currentProgress you can observe the animation progress from 0.0 to 1.0.
    >
    > --
    > ivan
    >
    >
previous month october 2006 next month
MTWTFSS
            1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31          
Go to today