What does "NS" means ?

  • Hi,
    I'm new to Cocoa and there is one thing I would like to know, so that
    I don't feel stupid...
    I'm hearing of "NSTextField", "NSTime", etc... but what does "NS"
    stands for ?

    Thanks,
    --
    Martin
  • NeXTStep.

    On 21 May 2005, at 20:37, Martin Ottenwaelter wrote:

    > I'm new to Cocoa and there is one thing I would like to know, so that
    > I don't feel stupid...
    > I'm hearing of "NSTextField", "NSTime", etc... but what does "NS"
    > stands for ?
  • Martin
    On May 21, 2005, at 1:37 PM, Martin Ottenwaelter wrote:

    > Hi,
    > I'm new to Cocoa and there is one thing I would like to know, so that
    > I don't feel stupid...
    > I'm hearing of "NSTextField", "NSTime", etc... but what does "NS"
    > stands for ?

    A google search for "what does ns in nstextfield stand for" actually
    produces some informative links. :-)
    To answer your question, it stands for NeXTSTEP.

    > Thanks,
    > --
    > Martin
    >

    Haris
  • Martin,

    On 21.5.2005, at 20:37, Martin Ottenwaelter wrote:

    > I'm new to Cocoa and there is one thing I would like to know, so
    > that I don't feel stupid...
    > I'm hearing of "NSTextField", "NSTime", etc... but what does "NS"
    > stands for ?

    Although it is not important at all, it does *not* mean NeXTStep, as
    some would say.

    There used to be a lot of classes of NeXTStep ages ago; these classes
    used to have a prefix NX (NX for NeXt).

    A few years later (than the NX- thingies was used), NeXT and Sun
    (yeah, strange as it sounds, indeed the very same company who later
    proved they don't know jacksh*** of object design with the Java
    crap!) designed a quite nice open (!) definition of a truly object-
    oriented application API. The thing was called OpenStep, and it used
    consistently an NS- prefix for "Next-Sun".

    The Cocoa of today is a direct successor of OpenStep. It extended it
    considerably, and it limited it here and there; the result, I admit,
    *is* better than the original OpenStep used to be. Nevertheless, it
    is not open anymore. Still, it keeps the original NS- (Next-Sun)
    prefixes.
    ---
    Ondra ÄŒada
    OCSoftware:    <ocs...>              http://www.ocs.cz
    private        <ondra...>            http://www.ocs.cz/oc
  • Well you learn something every day :) .

    On 21/05/05, Ondra Cada <ocs...> wrote:
    > Martin,
    >
    > On 21.5.2005, at 20:37, Martin Ottenwaelter wrote:
    >
    >> I'm new to Cocoa and there is one thing I would like to know, so
    >> that I don't feel stupid...
    >> I'm hearing of "NSTextField", "NSTime", etc... but what does "NS"
    >> stands for ?
    >
    > Although it is not important at all, it does *not* mean NeXTStep, as
    > some would say.
    >
    > There used to be a lot of classes of NeXTStep ages ago; these classes
    > used to have a prefix NX (NX for NeXt).
    >
    > A few years later (than the NX- thingies was used), NeXT and Sun
    > (yeah, strange as it sounds, indeed the very same company who later
    > proved they don't know jacksh*** of object design with the Java
    > crap!) designed a quite nice open (!) definition of a truly object-
    > oriented application API. The thing was called OpenStep, and it used
    > consistently an NS- prefix for "Next-Sun".
    >
    > The Cocoa of today is a direct successor of OpenStep. It extended it
    > considerably, and it limited it here and there; the result, I admit,
    > *is* better than the original OpenStep used to be. Nevertheless, it
    > is not open anymore. Still, it keeps the original NS- (Next-Sun)
    > prefixes.
    > ---
    > Ondra Èada
    > OCSoftware:    <ocs...>              http://www.ocs.cz
    > private        <ondra...>            http://www.ocs.cz/oc
    >
    >
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  • On May 21, 2005, at 5:13 PM, Ondra Cada wrote:

    >> I'm new to Cocoa and there is one thing I would like to know, so
    >> that I don't feel stupid...
    >> I'm hearing of "NSTextField", "NSTime", etc... but what does "NS"
    >> stands for ?
    >>
    >
    > Although it is not important at all, it does *not* mean NeXTStep,
    > as some would say.
    >
    > There used to be a lot of classes of NeXTStep ages ago; these
    > classes used to have a prefix NX (NX for NeXt).
    >
    > A few years later (than the NX- thingies was used), NeXT and Sun
    > (yeah, strange as it sounds, indeed the very same company who later
    > proved they don't know jacksh*** of object design with the Java
    > crap!) designed a quite nice open (!) definition of a truly object-
    > oriented application API. The thing was called OpenStep, and it
    > used consistently an NS- prefix for "Next-Sun".
    >
    > The Cocoa of today is a direct successor of OpenStep. It extended
    > it considerably, and it limited it here and there; the result, I
    > admit, *is* better than the original OpenStep used to be.
    > Nevertheless, it is not open anymore. Still, it keeps the original
    > NS- (Next-Sun) prefixes.

    I was under the impression, from talking to other developers, that
    the "NS" switch occurred before Sun entered the picture (to mean
    "NeXTStep"). And then when Sun began collaborating with NeXT, the
    "NeXT-Sun" nomenclature just kind of worked out conveniently. I am
    not sure if it's true, though.
  • On May 22, 2005, at 12:26 PM, John Stiles wrote:

    >
    > I was under the impression, from talking to other developers, that
    > the "NS" switch occurred before Sun entered the picture (to mean
    > "NeXTStep"). And then when Sun began collaborating with NeXT, the
    > "NeXT-Sun" nomenclature just kind of worked out conveniently. I am
    > not sure if it's true, though.

    I've also heard "NeXT Software" as the real meaning behind it all. I
    guess we get to choose :)

    -John
  • > On May 22, 2005, at 12:26 PM, John Stiles wrote:
    > I was under the impression, from talking to other developers, that
    > the "NS" switch occurred before Sun entered the picture (to mean
    > "NeXTStep"). And then when Sun began collaborating with NeXT, the
    > "NeXT-Sun" nomenclature just kind of worked out conveniently. I am
    > not sure if it's true, though.

    That pretty much nails it.  Sun entered the picture a bit after the
    NS prefix had come into play.

    The NS prefix came about in public APIs during the move from NeXTSTEP
    3.0 to NeXTSTEP 4.0 (also known as OpenStep).  Prior to 4.0, a
    handful of symbols used the NX prefix, but most classes provided by
    the system libraries were not prefixed at all -- List, Hashtable,
    View, etc...

    The NS prefix also happened at the same time that the system provided
    a String class -- NSString -- was introduced and [almost] all APIs
    were moved over to using strings objects instead of char*.    The
    move to string classes was strongly motivated by the desire to
    support many languages out of the box, something that most operating
    systems did poorly at the time.  In other words, NSString was not
    just to avoid the silliness of char* buffers and the potential
    crashers therein, but primarily to allow multi-byte characters to be
    easily handled without requiring much in the way of special cased
    code in the clients of the APIs.

    b.bum
    (who chatted w/some folks that did the NS* engineering work in the
    first place)
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